FROM THE ARCHIVES: Lack of Photos Is An Egregious Faux Pas in the Web Design World     MARKETING SNIPPETS: Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be. -Grandma Moses     GRANNYISM #29: Don't swallow your gum.~via SweetLeaf

UPDATE: DaylightViewfinder is no longer a live web site. But, I'm leaving the article here as it has some good information in it about a few things -- RocketTheme, entrepreneurship, iPhone and app marketing, etc. Regarding app marketing in particular, I'd written up another article on this topic -- here -- that you may be interested in.

I'm really excited to show off www.DaylightViewfinder.com, the new web site and home of Daylight Viewfinder, an iPhone eyepiece and app that allows people to take photos more easily while standing in bright sunlight or other high-glare situations (such as in the snow, at the beach, etc.). This project is a bit unusual for me, as it's not simply a web site built for a client; in this case, Marketing Portland is the official marketing agency for Daylight Viewfinder.

So, let me tell you a little about this product. The inventor, Paul Anderson, is an engineer. He's invented and patented some really amazing things. This one was inspired, as are so many inventions, by his own experiences. In this case, Paul found himself having a tough time seeing the iPhone screen while trying to take some photos up on Mt. Hood (a snowy, high-glare area). Let's face it: iPhones are great, and take super pics, but the screens aren't always easy to see in every situation. So, Paul invented an eyepiece that attaches to the iPhone via a suction mechanism. And his son Jay coded the accompanying app (available free in the app store), which shrinks the image and places it beneath the eyepiece. The eyepiece is like a little jewelr's lupe, and magnifies the image.

Thanks to Apple's retina display, the image beneath the eyepiece is sharp -- and now people can take those bright outdoor shots with significantly more ease.

As for the web site, we selected the Fracture template from RocketTheme. Fracture is written on RT's newest Gantry framework; it's fully responsive, and looks great on mobile devices (which, obviously, was fairly important in this case). We did a few modifications for iPhone, nevertheless. Of note to developers, I happened to discover that the "hidden-phone" class does not in fact work everywhere on this (and presumably other) RT templates that feature this class -- at least, not if you pass such class to Joomla as a module class sufix via the back-end module controls. I won't geek out too much here, but for anyone having trouble getting a RocketTheme slideshow module to hide for small-width displays like phones, perhaps this thread will shed some light on it for you.

I'm looking forward to seeing how this venture pans out for me. As I've said in the past, I'm not always 100% in the traditional box when it comes to client service. From time to time, if I like a deal or a proposal, I'll actually make an investment in it -- not a monetary investment, but perhaps an investment of time, resources, and other marketing expertise. There are, after all, other ways to be paid for one's services, such as a cut of the back end. On the other hand, I find myself saying "thanks but no thanks" more and more these days, too.

But, for this item, I truly believe it's got great potential. So, I'm making an investment in it, and hope to watch it find success. After all, I may not live in the sunniest place in the world, but it's easy to imagine the millions of iPhone users who likely need this product -- beachgoers, skiiers, real estate agents who are increasingly using iPhones for their outdoor property photos, iPhone photography enthusiasts, photographers, gadget junkies, nature photographers, any coastal or mountain-area residents... It's got quite a huge market!

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